“The Point”

The Point jutting out from Windgrove, Tasmania

“You can’t get there from here…” an old saying that fits this land feature. The Point is a sliver of a steep ridge jutting out into the Southern Ocean.  Walking it is like doing the edge of a razor blade.  It is public land, but it would be extremely difficult and hazardous to get to it without walking through Windgrove.  But no worries, Windgrove’s Gaia Walk takes you right there and even provides a bench for you to sit on.  Following are some photos of The Point.

Continue reading “The Point”

Seating for Dialogue

Berensohn/Lawrence Memorial Bench

Seating for Dialogue is one title that Peter Adams uses for describing a major aspect of his wood design practice – benches.  As you walk around Windgrove there is always a bench waiting for you around the next corner. If you have friends with you, all the better.  This post is simply updated photos of eight of his benches along the Gaia Walk. Continue reading Seating for Dialogue

Aviva Reed’s Illustrated Panels for the Gaia Walk

Cenozoic Era

Visual ecologist Aviva Reed was commissioned by Windgrove in 2012 to create 11 panels to illustrate the major periods and eras of life on earth for the newly created Gaia Walk.  Here is her website. Her newest book is Eon, The Story of the Fossils This post is simply photos of her 11 panels documented in situ after settling beautifully into the landscape.  Presented in chronological order as you would walk the trail.  The preceding post here gives a short intro to the Gaia Walk. Continue reading Aviva Reed’s Illustrated Panels for the Gaia Walk

Gaia Walk

Gaia Walk. Arched Stick Bench by Peter Adams and illustrated panel by Aviva Reed.

The Gaia Walk is the main core and thread to touring and understanding Windgrove. It is a 1.2 kilometer trail through most parts of Windgrove that is a scaled tour of the evolution of life on earth. Each step you take is 500,000 years. It starts 600 million years ago and ends up at “Today”.  This post is not an attempt to document the walk. As noted, these posts are a dump of photos taken during my residency and augment the existing extensive photos of Windgrove.   However, many of the themes I am trying to visualize hang off of the Gaia Walk.  We have to start with it.  If you want to understand more, check out the Windgrove website – search for “Gaia Walk” in the search box and peruse the posts in order.  Or you can just read the damn sign that starts off the walk…. Continue reading Gaia Walk

Circles and Trees, Addendum – J. Dewhurst

Jenny Dewhurst’s sea glass and beach stone sculpture at Windgrove. Sculpture 2001, Photo 2018.

Twice Windgrove hosted Australia’s national Sculpture By The Sea festival in its early years. Tens of thousands of people roamed Windgrove and looked at sculptures and views of the Southern Ocean.  For one festival in 2001 Jenny Dewhurst hauled in tons of gray stones smoothed by the action of breaking waves,  along with thousands of pieces of sea glass found on the beach. Continue reading Circles and Trees, Addendum – J. Dewhurst

Circles and Trees

Wombat Circle, 2017

For more than 20 years, Peter Adams has planted more than 9,000 trees at Windgrove’s 65 acres. Previously the land had been decimated by decades of unsustainable farming. Planting trees was one way to start the healing. The land becomes a canvas and the trees become the brush.  Peter – without drones, airplanes, surveying equipment, or google satellites – started making patterns. The circle became the shape of power. This post is a collection of aerial views of the circles and old photos of Peter planting trees.   Continue reading Circles and Trees

Workingman. Portraits of Peter Adams Working

Peter drawing circles for carving on his new Point Bench.

Continuing with current plan that for the next few months this blog will house a catalogue of photographs I took for Peter Adams and Windgrove during my 2 month residency, I post a few more based loosely on themes.  These photos are intended to be used by Windgrove for documentation and promotional purposes.  They are easy for people to see and link to.  Click on the photo to see a version that is designed for screen-based presentations.  Since many of the regular readers here know Peter, I will add in a few notes here and there. Enjoy.  Continue reading Workingman. Portraits of Peter Adams Working

Moonstone Mandala Temple in the Valley of Hope

Moonstone Mandala Temple in the Valley of Hope, Sally Horne, Windgrove Tasmania

There are a number of artists who have permanent installations at Windgrove.  Most are obvious and visible, but Sally Horne’s Moonstone Mandala Temple in the Valley of Hope is a secret.  You can never find it without a guide – and Windgrove is not that big! It is very tucked away in a hidden gully. In the detail shot you can see the 29 phases of the moon painted on rocks from the shores nearby. Click on a photo to see a higher res version.

Moonstone Mandala Temple, detail, Sally Horne

Budda Beads and Belly Buttons

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Belly Button, (nickname), Huon Pine, Peter Adams, 2017.

There are two large sculptures at Windgrove by Peter Adams that were too difficult to transport to Hobart for professional photographs.  Plus, the photographer’s studio couldn’t hold them.  So on rare evenings when it wasn’t windy, cloudy, cold, rainy, or crowded with guests, we photographed them in his front yard.  For you photo geeks out there, this is using a little Fuji mirrorless APC camera to mimic a 4×5 camera. The resulting image is 14K x 10K. At full res you can count the legs on the little lady bug up on the top left corner. Continue reading Budda Beads and Belly Buttons

Windgrove Peace Garden, Tasmania

Split Rock, Moonrise

I’ve decided to use this blog as a catalog for photos of Windgrove that Windgrove’s creator, Peter Adams, can peruse and choose from.  You, lucky or not, get to peruse them as well. These are photos I took during the 2 month residency there and augment the more than 3,000 photos that Peter has in his collection.  Slowly, over these cold weeks here on the east coast of the US, as winter refuses to die, I am culling and prepping images that he can use. In May,  Peter is one of three individuals selected to speak to his 50th graduating class at Harvard. Apparently he needs some photos to help him…  So here they come. No text, no explanation, just images. Organized by themes that he and I worked with over the last 2 years. Somehow the images feel better here than on Flickr.  Its quiet here and only a few people. Enjoy. (Click an image for higher res version). Continue reading Windgrove Peace Garden, Tasmania

A Mad Crush on Wedge Island

How can you not fall in love with Wedge Island?  It’s like the soft gentle warm back of the old family dog sitting on the porch looking out at the far off perimeters. Guarding. Protecting. Head on paws. Watching as boats and storms go by – nary a twitch of the ear, just an eye tracking the wake.  Who knows, Antarctica is only 2000 miles away, one needs to always be on the ready… And the name, Wedge Island, can it be any better? Nope. You can’t forget it. So Wedge Island has become my Monet’s Haystack.  I can’t keep from making images of it. However, Wedge Island has another side – its head that faces the Antarctic and the onslaught of rough weather. Continue reading A Mad Crush on Wedge Island

#TreesAreBeautiful.

A deep bow and a tip of the lens cap to @jvhenkel and “his” hashtag #treesarebeautiful.  It was a highlight of my last year in terms of social media and an important contrast for me to the din of Facebook’s echo chamber. It made many of us look at trees a bit more. If you don’t follow Jim on Instagram, you should. I hope that 2018 continues the trend. Touring around Tasmania these last weeks and thinking of the hashtag enticed my camera to focus on trees occasionally.  These following ones won’t make it to Instagram, but enjoy them in the spirit of #treesarebeautiful.  Thanks Jim. Happy New Year. Continue reading #TreesAreBeautiful.

Cubed. Still the World’s Best Coffee, Location, People, and Aprons

I am not going to waste bandwidth describing again Cubed, the great solar eco silver coffee van trailer in Eaglehawk Neck, Tasmania.  You can read my earlier posts from two years ago here and a follow up here.  Or you can check out Laurie and Fabienne’s website here. Just today I finally got to stop by and have a flat white like no other.  Now, after a mere 3 years of Cubed making single origin espresso coffee and German sweets from sustainable sources, it is clear that people have gotten the message.  They now show up to get their photo in front of Cubed – not a shot just 3 meters away of themselves in front of the dramatic Tasman Peninsula and the sheer cliffs of Cape Hauy. Continue reading Cubed. Still the World’s Best Coffee, Location, People, and Aprons

Ohio, Tasmania, and World Heritage Areas

TasmaniaOhio

Numerous Tassies, when attempting to explain Tasmania to me, used the example that Tasmania is about the size of Ohio. I took the time and did a pretty good job of comparing their sizes. Since many of you who are actually reading this blog have a personal relationship to Ohio, I thought you might enjoy the following in trying to visualize just how much of Tasmania is totally wild. Untouched.

Continue reading Ohio, Tasmania, and World Heritage Areas

Silence and Airplanes

SilenceSky

Except for one day flying from Australia to New Zealand I haven’t seen a plane high in the sky since early December.  No commercial flights flyover Tasmania – where would they be going?  Same with South Island – there is just no where to fly to. Neither of these places are on the path to someplace else unless it is Antartica.   It is actually noticeable after awhile.  And the silence is spectacular, – deep and encompassing.  No way to give the experience of silence through online media.

WWOOFers

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Emily and I have new lines for our resumes, “wwoofer.”  World Wide Organic Farms or Willing Worker On Organic Farm.  Its a common term here.  In the best case scenario a wwoofer works anywhere from 4-6 hours a day and receives room and board.  The idea is that they learn aspects of organic farming – hands on.  Many younger folk use it as a way to afford to travel around Australia. Continue reading WWOOFers

Extreme Gardening: The Possum Wars.

GardenPanoCropped

Ruth, a friend of Peter and a human rights lawyer, was staying at Windgrove for a week and joked with the phrase “Extreme Gardening.”  Living in Tasmania brings out the extreme in people or, more likely, it attracts people who take activities to the extreme:  Extreme Sports, Extreme Outdoors, Extreme Survivalists, Extreme Cooking, etc.  And so she added in Extreme Gardening.  Its true.  It is tough growing things here – especially organic. Continue reading Extreme Gardening: The Possum Wars.

From Peppermints to the Kings

It’s hard to take a photo here WITHOUT a Eucalyptus tree being in the shot.

Silver Peppermint Eucalyptus Trees in foreground of Roaring Beach.
Silver Peppermint Eucalyptus trees in foreground of Roaring Beach.

So my sister wants a post about Eucalyptus Trees.  Again, I am not the one to be giving solid info, but I am photographing them – its hard not to. There are so many kinds, shapes, colors, and sizes. Many are called Peppermint: Silver, Black, Swamp, White, Risdon. Then a favorite, Stringy Bark.  And then the largest flowering plant in the world, the second largest tree in the world (second to the Redwood), around 300′ tall, is the Eucalyptus Regnans (King).

Emily at the base of a Eucalyptus Regnans.
Emily at the base of a Eucalyptus Regnans.

Click on to see the whole tree and many others.  Continue reading From Peppermints to the Kings

She-oaks Feed the Soul

She-Oaks at the Edge of Wombat Circle.
She-oaks at the Edge of Wombat Circle.

This post is for Marsha who asked about the trees….  You can’t ignore them here. They struggle, they survive, they bend and roar with the wind, they are beautiful, and they come in all shapes, sizes, and types.  However, the She-oak captures your attention before others – even before the spectacular Eucalypus.  The She-oak is the tree that you first notice.  This is the tree that Peter has planted the most – 60% of the 9000 trees he planted are She-oaks. These are the trees that he uses to create his largest circles. They native, tough and can withstand the environment here.  These are the trees that make those beautiful bubble shapes from the aerial views of the drone. Continue reading She-oaks Feed the Soul

Ana Wraps a Rock

AnaWrapsRock

I’ve been at Peter’s Windgrove almost a month and have been able to observe the more than 100 visitors that have passed through here.  Some are old deep friends of his, some are local neighbors, some he doesn’t know and they are just stopping by to walk the place, and some come here strictly by word of mouth to do art.  My first week here Peter got an email from Ana asking if she could come and spend a few days. She arrived a few days ago and immediately hit the beach to do some work.  It was very windy, but I got the drone out… Continue reading Ana Wraps a Rock

Seating for Dialogue

SeatingForDialoge

When Peter was working at Findhorn, Scotland (a spiritual community, learning centre and ecovillage) he started a series of benches entitled Seating for Dialogue. This work continued at Windgrove and many of them have been installed around his property.  Over the years he has had different “walks” that allow you to experience them.  I take this walk daily.  The first impression of the benches and the overall series title is that they encourage dialogue, storytelling and communication between two or more people. However, as I have experienced this last month, the benches also encourage internal conversations and dialogues with the natural world.    Many of the benches are 10-20 years old and though some have been installed in museums and homes, these here have weathered into the environment, are used daily, and are an integral part of the landscape. Following is a simple set of photos of some of the benches. Continue reading Seating for Dialogue